My Thoughts on Being Adopted

Turn on a made-for-TV movie or one of those “reality” shows about adoption and you’ll find adult children in serious angst over being given up. Everyone seems to be frantically searching for natural mothers and birth siblings. Invariably during the program’s second segment, after the commercial break, the viewer meets the long-suffering mother. Apparently she never stopped loving, worrying about, and searching for the baby taken from her or surrendered during a momentary lapse of judgment. These stories have always rung false for me, or at least overly “Hollywood” dramatic.
Do I believe such situations exist in real life? Yes, indeed. But are they the norm as the producers would have us believe? Not by a long shot, in my opinion. I’ve known too many adopted friends and siblings who suffered disappointments or faced disaster after discovering their “roots.” Personally, I hold no grudge or latent hostility for the woman who gave me up, but I also possess no buried affection either. She is a stranger. Throughout my life I’ve been offended by the predictable question: Don’t you want to know who your real mom is? I’ve always replied, “No, because I know who my real mother is—she’s the one who wiped my runny nose, fixed my peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, and put up with my sassy mouth as a teenager.
As a writer who was adopted from Children’s Services as an infant, I chose to explore this issue from a different viewpoint…as the woman who gave up her child. In Always in my Heart, my novella from An Amish Miracle, Hope Bowman believes God punished her for giving up her firstborn son and because she hid this secret from her husband. Although Hope is thankful for three daughters, she still prays for a son. But instead of a new baby, God sends her the fifteen-year-old boy she had abandoned.
Writing that novella several years ago turned out to be therapeutic for me. But in my upcoming release, Hiding in Plain Sight, I chose to tackle this sensitive issue from a different viewpoint, as a biological sibling in need of an organ transplant. I thank God that I haven’t needed a transplant thus far, but this situation happens every day. Although my adoptive parents were the only ones I ever knew and as “real” as birth parents to me, other adoptees might choose a different path. I hope you’ll enjoy my Amish novella or my next book, Hiding in Plain Sight, about two young women brought together to save one life.
The award-winning Always in My Heart (novella) is available in Kindle from Amazon, or in the paperback anthology, An Amish Miracle from Harper Collins Christian Publishing.
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Thoughts on Being Adopted

Happy Thursday, readers. The holidays are behind us. I thought I’d share something personal with you.AmishMiracle 1

Turn on a made-for-TV movie or one of those “reality” shows about adoption and you’ll find adult children in serious angst over being given up. Everyone seems to be frantically searching for natural mothers and birth siblings. Invariably during the program’s second segment, after the commercial break, the viewer meets the long-suffering mother. Apparently she never stopped loving, worrying about, and searching for the baby taken from her or surrendered during a momentary lapse of judgment. These stories have always rung false for me, or at least overly “Hollywood” dramatic.

Do I believe such situations exist in real life? Yes, indeed. But are they the norm as the producers would have us believe? Not by a long shot, in my opinion. I’ve known too many adopted friends and siblings who suffered disappointments or faced disaster after discovering their “roots.” Personally, I hold no grudge or latent hostility for the woman who gave me up, but I also possess no buried affection either. She is a stranger. Throughout my life I’ve been offended by the predictable question: Don’t you want to know who your real mom is? I’ve always replied, “No, because I know who my real mother is—she’s the one who wiped my runny nose, fixed my peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, and put up with my sassy mouth as a teenager.

As a writer adopted from Children’s Services as an infant, I chose to explore this issue from another viewpoint…as the woman who gave up her child. In Always in my Heart, my novella from An Amish Miracle, Hope Bowman believes God has punished her for giving up her firstborn son. And she’s hidden this secret from her husband. Although Hope is thankful for three daughters, she still prays for a son. But instead of a new baby, God sends her the fifteen-year-old boy she abandoned.

Writing this novella turned out to be therapeutic, even though I’m well beyond the normal age for therapy. Tackling a sensitive and personal issue from another angle allowed me to come full circle. I experienced a bit of catharsis at my fictional story’s conclusion. My adoptive parents were the only parents I ever wished to know and were as “real” as any birth parents. But I hope you’ll look for my tale about a young man who chose a different path than mine. An Amish Miracle anthology is available everywhere in print and electronic download. Always in my Heart novella will be available on February 14th at Amazon for Kindles. Always in My Heart cover

http://www.amazon.com/Always-My-Heart-Miracle-Novella-ebook/dp/B00E68O026/ref=sr_1_3?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1388707155&sr=1-3&keywords=always+in+my+heart

My new anthology with Beth Wiseman and Ruth Reid is here

Happy Monday, readers,

I hope you had a lovely Thanksgiving holiday and still have plenty of leftovers for sandwiches. I adore turkey, so feel free to send some my way. Today I’m happy to announce my collection of novellas with Beth Wiseman and Ruth Reid is available in both print and electronic versions. Always in My Heart, from the anthology An Amish Miracle was a joy to write last November on the beautiful shores of Jekyll Island, Georgia. And working with Beth and Ruth was a dream come true. Both are super people, Beth and Ruthbesides great authors. My novella deals with adoption, and as an adopted child myself, I was delighted to delve into his complex topic.

Here are the blurbs: Always Beautiful by Beth Wiseman: Becky Byler is eighteen and overweight. She is overwhelmed by the embarrassment she feels when comparing herself to other girls her age. Having lost all hope, she considers taking her own life. As she stands before rushing water, unable to swim, Becky begs God for a miracle. In just several months, Becky sees her prayers answered as food and temptation lose their hold over her. She’s finally pleased with how she looks, but does she like the person she has become? And has the man she has dreamed of been right beside her all along, loving her exactly as she is?

Always His Providence by Ruth Reid: Widow Rosa Hostetler has one month to pay her delinquent taxes before the county auctions her farm. She’s prepared to sell whatever is necessary to pay the lien, but she isn’t willing to request money from the community’s widow fund. She’s embarrassed and refuses to admit she needs help. Rosa depends on income from selling eggs, but when that income is threatened, only a miracle can help Rosa accept the kindness of a neighbor.

Always in My Heart by Mary Ellis: Hope Bowman believes God is punishing her for giving up her firstborn son when she was a teenager. She’s hidden this secret from her husband, who is thankful for their daughters but longs for a son. Hope prays desperately, but the son God sends her isn’t a new baby but the fifteen-year-old boy she gave up years ago.

I hope you’ll look for An Amish Miracle from Harper Collins Christian Publishing wherever Christian books are sold, or at www.christianbook.com , www.amazon.com or www.barnesandnoble.com My novella, Always in my Heart, will also be available on Feb. 14th as a Kindle download by itself from Amazon.Always in My Heart coverAmishMiracle 1

Have a great week, readers.

Don’t let the holiday rush dampen your spirits.

I’ve been gone, but now I’m back!

Happy Sunday evening, readers,

Does anyone enjoy coming home from vacation? So much mail to go through, so many emails, so much laundry, pick up the dog, restock the fridge, pay the bills, catch up on yard work…the list goes on and on! But what a lovely vacation I had! First we visited family in Texas and enjoyed a wonderful Easter in San Antonio. I loved the RiverWalk and the historic missions. I truly would have enjoyed attending Mass at the Mission of San Juan, even though I’m not Catholic. What a breathtakingly beautiful church/mission.

Next we visited Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana–two of my favorite cities on earth. Although the French Quarter has plenty of things that I don’t appreciate, I still love the architecture, the music and of course, the food. Now plenty of writing and editing awaits, but I had to share some photos of a priceless vacation. I hope everyone has a lovely week as I return to the edits of A Little Bit of Charm, edits of Always in my Heart (novella), writing A Plain Man, and writing A Heart Divided (historical romance set during the Civil War)

Whew, I’ll need another vacation once all these projects are done! Have a super week of spring, readers!   Mary

GEGE

GEGE